Deceptive Practices, Thy Name Is Obamacare

FTC Policy Statement On Deception (1983):

Section 5 of the FTC Act declares unfair or deceptive acts or practices unlawful….

First, there must be a representation, omission or practice that is likely to mislead the consumer. Practices that have been found misleading or deceptive in specific cases include false oral or written representations, misleading price claims, sales of hazardous or systematically defective products or services without adequate disclosures, failure to disclose information regarding pyramid sales, use of bait and switch techniques, failure to perform promised services, and failure to meet warranty obligations.

Second, we examine the practice from the perspective of a consumer acting reasonably in the circumstances. If the representation or practice affects or is directed primarily to a particular group, the Commission examines reasonableness from the perspective of that group.

Third, the representation, omission, or practice must be a “material” one. The basic question is whether the act or practice is likely to affect the consumer’s conduct or decision with regard to a product or service. If so, the practice is material, and consumer injury is likely, because consumers are likely to have chosen differently but for the deception. In many instances, materiality, and hence injury, can be presumed from the nature of the practice. In other instances, evidence of materiality may be necessary.

Thus, the Commission will find deception if there is a representation, omission or practice that is likely to mislead the consumer acting reasonably in the circumstances, to the consumer’s detriment.

Alas, the President of the United States, and his Administration, are not held to the same legal standards that apply to the private sector; if they were, they would no longer be in business, and perhaps in Federal prison, for promulgating the ongoing fraud called Obamacare.

Andrew C. McCarthy, “The Scheme behind the Obamacare Fraud” (read the whole thing; it is a magnificent overview):

billthecatACAObama moderated his rhetoric over the years, but not his ideological goals. He stressed pragmatism: a gradual campaign that kept the ultimate prize in sight. “I don’t think we’re going to be able to eliminate employer coverage immediately,” he told his hard-Left base at a 2007 SEIU health-care forum. “There’s going to be potentially some transition process. I can envision a decade out or 15 years or 20 years out”….

The manufactured financial crisis [resulting from the inevitable collapse of the Obamacare fraud] will be portrayed as a demonstration that exchanges based on the assumption that individuals will take responsibility for their own “private” insurance arrangements do not work. It will be time to solve the crisis by a seamless transition–there’s that word again–to a fully socialized health-care system, now overtly controlled by the government. “Free” health care for everyone–with all the substandard treatment, absurd wait times, and rationing that entails–will be supported by a few “tweaks” to our progressive tax system…no more unwieldy, unpredictable premium payments.

That’s the scheme. Or maybe you still believe that if you like your private medical system, you can keep your private medical system, period.

If only.

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